Exxon-Mobile: Evironmentally evil empire (EEE)

Tonight I will put up two posts, this one, encouraging you to read the sierra club article rating oil companies and another on the pizza at Sette Osteria. The reason for the prologue is, while having a lunch at Sette by myself, I overheard another table talking about the billions of dollars that Exxon made this year and some of the atrocities committed by the company. I love this city! I had to intrude on their conversation. Only a week or two ago my friend and colleague Soumya sent me an article posted by the Sierra club rating Exxon-Mobile as one of the leading environmental and social offenders. Unfortunately, we are so dependent upon oil that if it were to run out tomorrow we would be faced with utter chaos. In fact, it would be the greatest national disaster of all time. Given that we now measure fossil fuel in DECADES, we, as a nation, should be very, very concerned. But until the gas-guzzling cars are permanently parked, perhaps we could at least choose to fuel our car through an oil company where the executives make a few responsible choices and a few less egregious assaults on the environment–the lesser of the evils, if you will.

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2 Comments

  1. spencer said,

    February 12, 2007 at 3:28 pm

    Unfortunately, we are so dependent upon oil that if it were to run out tomorrow we would be faced with utter chaos. In fact, it would be the greatest national disaster of all time. Given that we now measure fossil fuel in DECADES, we, as a nation, should be very, very concerned.

    Hell, it would take decades just to realign our urban land use patterns to adapt to a serious, permanent oil supply shock . . . assuming, of course, that we’d even bother. What will probably happen instead is that the urban poor will be displaced, not just from their neighborhoods but from the city itself as suburbanites begin bidding up land prices in the inner city and relocating inward. The poor will end up in the suburbs – sort of similar to the way it works in Paris, but far worse for our poor because most American suburbs have absolutely no public transportation infrastructure.

    Most people focus on the likely economic impacts of the decline and eventual loss of oil as the engine of American life, but I’ve seen relatively few studies on the likely social impacts, which are IMO likely to be far more intractable than the economic problems.

    And oh yeah – f*** Exxon-Mobil. Right in the you-know-what.

  2. February 13, 2007 at 10:17 pm

    Interesting–I had never thought about that. I had better keep my 326 sq foot apartment in the city, huh?


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